Advisory Committees


Smarter Balanced works with teams of national experts to develop a balanced assessment system accurately measures student progress and growth toward college and career readiness.

 

Advisory Committees

 


Technical Advisory Committee

The Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) provides guidance on technical assessment matters pertaining to validity and reliability, accuracy, and fairness. Members of the TAC are highly regarded national experts who have been widely published in their fields. Areas of expertise include: assessment design; computer adaptive testing (CAT); assessment accommodations; uses of tests; mathematics, and English language arts/literacy.


Jamal Abedi, Ph.D.

Jamal Abedi is a professor in the School of Education at the University of California, Davis and a research partner at the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST). He also currently serves as the advisor to the UK national assessment department, Office of Qualifications and Examination Regulation. In 2003, Abedi received the National Professional Service Award from the American Educational Research Association. He is also the recipient of the 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award by the California Educational Research Association. Abedi received his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.


Randy Bennett, Ph.D.

Randy Bennett is the Norman O. Frederiksen Chair in Assessment Innovation for the Research & Development Division of the Educational Testing Service (ETS) in Princeton, New Jersey.

From 1999 through 2005, Bennett directed the NAEP Technology Based Assessment project, which explored the use of computerized testing for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). He received the ETS Senior Scientist Award in 1996 and the ETS Career Achievement Award in 2005. Bennett is a graduate of the doctoral program at Teachers College, Columbia University.


Derek C. Briggs, Ph.D.

Derek Briggs is associate professor, Research and Evaluation Methodology, in the School of Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Briggs received the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Division D Mary Catherine Ellwein Outstanding Dissertation Award. He serves on the Editorial Board for Educational Assessment. Briggs received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.


Gregory J. Cizek, Ph.D.

Gregory Cizek is professor of Educational Measurement and Evaluation at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

He is the recipient of the 2006 AERA Division D award for Significant Contribution to Educational Measurement and Research Methodology and the 2007 recipient of the National Council on Measurement in Education award for Outstanding Dissemination of Educational Measurement Concepts. He served from 2007–2009 as an appointed member of the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB), which oversees the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Cizek received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University.


David T. Conley, Ph.D.

David Conley is Professor of Educational Policy and Leadership in the College of Education, University of Oregon. He is the founder and director of the Center for Educational Policy Research at the University of Oregon, and founder and chief executive officer of the Educational Policy Improvement Center.

Since 2008, Conley has served as Special Consultant to the Chief Operating Officer of the College Board, New York. He has also served as Special Advisor to the College Board. Conley received his doctoral degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder.


Linda Darling-Hammond, Ph.D.

Linda Darling-Hammond is Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at the Stanford University School of Education. She also serves on the Board of Directors for the Wallace Foundation, the Education Leadership Advisory Council for the Stuart Foundation, and the Executive Board for the National Academy of Education.

Darling-Hammond has received the McGraw Hill Prize for Innovation in Education, the Friend of the NEA Award from National Education Association, and the Outstanding Teaching Award from the Stanford University School of Education. She is a past president of the American Educational Research Association. Darling-Hammond received her Ed.D. from Temple University.


Brian Gong, Ph.D.

Brian Gong is the executive director of the non-profit National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment, Inc. (Center for Assessment).

He served as co-chair of the Validation Committee for the Common Core State Standards published by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers. By invitation from the U.S. Department of Education, Gong was a part of the team that wrote the No Child Left Behind Peer Review Guidance for Accountability Systems and the Growth Model Pilot. Gong received his Ph.D. from Stanford University.


Edward Haertel, Ph.D.

Edward Haertel is the Jacks Family Professor of Education at the Stanford University School of Education.

Haertel has served as president of the National Council on Measurement in Education, chairs the Technical Advisory Committee concerned with California’s school accountability system, chairs the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment (BOTA), and from 2000 to 2003 chaired the Committee on Standards, Design, and Methodology of the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB). Haertel received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.


Joan Herman, Ph.D.

Joan Herman is the Director of the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST).

Herman served on the National Academy’s Committee on the Design of Science Assessment. She is currently the editor of Educational Assessment. Herman received her Ed.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.


G. Gage Kingsbury, Ph.D.

Gage Kingsbury is a private psychometric consultant providing advice and development work in the application of technology to practical assessment situations.

Kingsbury designed the first adaptive tests used in educational settings, and helped to design adaptive tests that are currently administered to K-12 students in every state. He also served as a developer of the ACE standards for computerized adaptive testing and the ATP guidelines for computerized test development and use. Kingsbury currently serves as the president of the International Association for Computerized Adaptive Testing. He is also an associate editor for the Journal of Computerized Adaptive Testing. He serves as a research fellow for the Hong Kong Institute of Education and has received the Award for Outstanding Contributions to Educational Assessment from National Association of Test Directors. He founded the Center for Research on Academic Growth at NWEA (since renamed the Kingsbury Center). Kingsbury holds a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Minnesota.


James W. Pellegrino, Ph.D.

James Pellegrino is Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor and Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

He is a Fellow of AERA, a lifetime National Associate of the National Academy of Sciences and a past member of the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Research Council. In 2007 he was elected to lifetime membership in the National Academy of Education. Pellegrino received his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado.


W. James Popham, Ph.D.

W. James Popham is Professor Emeritus, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Popham is a past president and fellow of AERA. He was also the founding editor of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a quarterly journal published by AERA. At UCLA he won several distinguished teaching awards. In January 2000, he was recognized by UCLA Today as one of UCLA’s top 20 professors of the 20th Century. In 2002, the National Council on Measurement in Education presented him with its Award for Career Contributions to Educational Measurement. In 2009, he was appointed to the National Assessment Governing Board. Popham received his Ed.D. from Indiana University.


Joseph Ryan, Ph.D.

Joseph Ryan is Professor Emeritus of Arizona State University and head of Educational Measurement Systems.

Ryan has been named an Inaugural Fellow by the American Educational Research Association. Ryan received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.


Martha Thurlow, Ph.D.

Martha Thurlow is the director for the National Center on Educational Outcomes and Senior Research Associate, Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota.

She served on the CCSSO-NGA Common Core State Standards Initiative Validation Committee. Thurlow received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota.

 


English Language Learners Advisory Committee

The English Language Learners Advisory Committee is comprised of national experts in ELL assessment, bilingual education, and language acquisition. This committee will provide feedback to Smarter Balanced staff, work groups, and contractors to ensure that the assessments provide valid, reliable, and fair measures of achievement and growth for English learners.


Jamal Abedi, Ph.D.

Jamal Abedi is a professor in the School of Education at University of California at Davis and a research partner at the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST). He serves as the advisor to the UK’s Office of Qualifications and Examination Regulation, an independent agency responsible for the integrity of national assessment systems. Abedi received the 2003 National Professional Service Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA). He is also the recipient of the 2008 Lifetime Achievement Award from the California Educational Research Association. Abedi received his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.


Edward Bosso

Ed Bosso is the vice president of the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University. He is also the president of the Conference of Educational Administrators of Schools and Programs for the Deaf (CEASD). At the national level, CEASD serves as an advocate for the deaf and hard of hearing with governmental bodies concerned with the establishment of educational policy and the implementation of federal legislation. Bosso is also the vice president of the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University. He has helped the center with the development of ASL content standards to facilitate linguistic competence for deaf and hard of hearing students in both ASL and English.

Prior to this he served as the assistant superintendent of Human Resources in the Christina School District where he previously was the Director of Delaware Programs for Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Deafblind Children and the Principal of the Delaware School for the Deaf. Additionally, he has worked at other schools and programs for deaf and hard of hearing students as well as served as adjunct faculty at McDaniel College.

Bosso earned his master’s in educational administration at California State University, Northridge as part of the National Leadership Training Program and is currently completing his doctoral work in Educational Leadership at the University of Delaware.


Donna Christian, Ph.D.

Donna Christian is a senior fellow at the Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) following 16 years as CAL’s president. Her work has focused on the role of language in education, including issues of second language learning, bilingualism, and dialect diversity. She is on the Board of Directors of The International Research Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF) and serves on numerous editorial and advisory boards. She was awarded the Promoting Bilingualism Award from the Two-Way California Association of Bilingual Education (CABE) organization (2006). She received her M.S. in applied linguistics and Ph.D. in sociolinguistics from Georgetown University.


Richard Durán, Ph.D.

Richard Durán is a professor at the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at University of California at Santa Barbara. Previously he was a research scientist at ETS, where he conducted investigations and published findings on the validity of the SAT, GRE, and TOEFL. His specialty research areas include assessment and education policy, and education interventions serving English language learners and Latino students and families. He serves as director of the UCSB component of the California Engaging Latino Communities for Education (ENLACE) Project and its family and community school engagement strand. He received his Ph.D. in psychology from UC Berkeley.


Kathy Escamilla, Ph.D.

Kathy Escamilla is a professor of education in the division of social, bilingual, and multicultural foundations at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Escamilla is a member of numerous professional organizations in education and has served two terms as the president of the National Association for Bilingual Education. She was recently appointed co-editor of the Bilingual Research Journal, and has served as chair of the Bilingual Education Research Special Interest Group for AERA. She received her Ph.D. in curriculum and the study of schooling from UCLA.


James Green, Ph.D.

James Green began his direct involvement in Native American education in 1979 as assistant principal at Red Cloud Indian School in Pine Ridge, SD. Through his interest in Native languages, Green collaborated in the 1980s with Caleb Gattegno, originator of the Silent Way of Teaching and Words in Color, to develop the teaching materials for the Lakota and Dakota languages. He became the director of the Institute for Dakota Studies at the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal College (SD) in 1990, where he developed a new A.A. degree curriculum in Native Studies. In 1996 he became director of the Alliance Project for Tribal Colleges, a national teacher education project funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) and headquartered at Vanderbilt University. He also taught Lakota and Dakota languages at South Dakota State University as an adjunct professor from 1992-2002.

In 2003 Green began a dual appointment at the Monarch Center, University of Illinois Chicago, and as paraprofessional coordinator for the Alaska Partnership for Teacher Enhancement at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). The Monarch Center work continued his responsibility to assist with the development of special education teaching-training at tribal colleges; his primary work in Alaska was to respond to the need in rural and Alaska Native village schools for “highly qualified” paraprofessionals under No Child Left Behind. He designed a set of core courses for paraeducators through UAA and delivered them onsite in Alaska Native villages.

In 2008 he joined the staff of the federal Equity Assistance Center housed in the School of Education at the University of Colorado Boulder and led by Leonard Baca and Janette Klinger as co-principal investigators. His work with the Equity Assistance Center has been primarily with K-12 school districts in South Dakota, North Dakota, and Montana. Green serves as a liaison with state offices of education, local school districts, Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) schools, and Tribal Education Departments to provide professional development and direction on Native culture and language and their effect on the academic achievement of American Indian and Alaska Native students. Green continues to serve on the Steering Committee for the IRIS Center at Vanderbilt University, a national project to provide high-quality resources on students with disabilities (http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/about_center/about_board_advisors.html).

Green completed his master’s in American Indian curriculum development from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) in 1980. Green received his doctorate in education at the University of Minnesota in 2006. His research dissertation was titled Paradigm Adherence and the Great Debate on Reading.


Kenji Hakuta, Ph.D.

Kenji Hakuta is the Lee L. Jacks professor of education at Stanford University. He was the founding dean of social sciences, humanities, and arts at UC Merced. He is currently chair of the National Research Council’s Workshop on the Role of Language in School Learning: Implications for Closing the Achievement Gap; chair of the National Academy of Education’s Research Advisory Committee; member of the Validation Committee for the Common Core State Standards; and chair of the AERA Task Force on IES Reauthorization. He received his Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Harvard University.


Okhee Lee, Ph.D.

Okhee Lee is a professor of childhood education at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. She became an AERA Fellow in 2009 and received the Distinguished Career Award from the AERA Committee on Scholars of Color in Education in 2003. She has directed research and teacher enhancement projects funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Spencer Foundation. She received her Ph.D. in educational psychology from Michigan State University.


Robert Linquanti

Robert Linquanti is project director for English Learner Evaluation and Accountability Support (ELEAS) and senior researcher for the California Comprehensive Center at WestEd. He serves on the Texas State Assessment Technical Advisory Committee, the California English Language Development Test Technical Advisory Group, and the national Working Group on ELL Policy. He received his M.P.A. in public policy from Columbia University.


Maria Santos

Maria Santos is the deputy superintendent of instruction, leadership, and equity-in-action for the Oakland Unified School District in California. She is a co-chair of the English language learner initiative, and helped organize a steering committee of local ELL experts to plan and implement the initiative. She was the senior instructional manager and superintendent for the Office of English Language Learning at the New York City Department of Education and was an education program officer at the Wallace–Reader’s Digest Funds, where she designed the Leadership for Educational Achievement in Districts (LEAD) project.


Guadalupe Valdes, Ph.D.

Guadalupe Valdes is the Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum professor of education at Stanford University. Her research explores issues of bilingualism relevant to teachers in training, including methods of instruction, typologies, measurement of progress, and the role of education in national policies on immigration. She is a member of the National Academy of Education, an AERA Fellow, a member of the Board of Trustees for ETS, and a member of several editorial boards for language and linguistics publications. She received her Ph.D. in Spanish from Florida State University.


Students with Disabilities Advisory Committee

The Students with Disabilities Advisory Committee is comprised of national experts in learning disabilities, assistive technology, and accessibility and accommodations policy. This committee will provide feedback to Smarter Balanced staff, work groups, and contractors to ensure that the assessments provide valid, reliable, and fair measures of achievement and growth for students with disabilities.


Carol Allman, Ph.D.

Carol Allman was a teacher of VI and an administrator for VI programs at local and state levels. Allman is an adjunct professor at Florida State University teaching braille. Allman also serves as a consultant for the American Printing House for the Blind where she provides workshops on accessibility of state testing programs for students with visual impairments. She serves on the Michigan Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and is on contract with Measured Progress to review items for the Florida alternate assessment and provide other VI expertise to that project. As an expert in the area of visual impairments, she co-authored books and presented at professional conferences. Allman received a B.S. in elementary education, an M .S. in visual impairments, and a Ph.D. in early childhood/special education with a minor in statistics and research from Florida State University.


Bridget Dalton, Ed.D.

Bridget Dalton is an assistant professor in the School of Education at the University of Colorado Bolder. Her research interests include literacy and technology, struggling readers, and adolescent literacy. She focuses on the development and study of universally designed scaffolded strategic digital literacy environments for diverse learners. She is particularly interested in improving literacy and engagement outcomes for students who struggle to learn in school. Dalton is currently collaborating with co-principal investigators Catherine Snow of Harvard University, Patrick Proctor of Boston College, and colleagues at CAST, Inc., on a U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences (IES) study comparing the effects of digital texts with embedded vocabulary and strategy instruction supports on the reading achievement of Spanish-English bilingual students and English-only students. She recently completed another IES reading comprehension project with co-principal investigator Annemarie Palincsar of the University of Michigan. The latter study investigated the role of interactive diagrams and pedagogical agents in supporting students’ comprehension of science text. Dalton has also served as the Chief Officer of Literacy and Technology for CAST, Inc., a non-profit research and development organization that develops and applies universal design for learning theory and practice. She also was an associate professor at the University of Guam, where she directed the Literacy Lab and coordinated the graduate program in Language and Literacy, and was a lecturer in education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Dalton has published numerous books and articles. Dalton received her doctorate in reading, language, and learning disabilities from Harvard University.


Donald D. Deshler, Ph.D.

Donald Deshler is currently a professor of special education at the University of Kansas where he also serves as director for the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning. Deshler serves as an advisor on adolescent achievement to several other organizations, including the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the National Governors Association, the Council on Families and Literacy, and the U. S. State Department. He recently received a presidential appointment to the National Institute for Literacy’s advisory board. Deshler has presented on education policy regarding adolescent literacy for the nation’s governors at the James B. Hunt Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy and has testified before Congress and several state legislatures on secondary school reform. Through the Aspen Institute he has worked with members of Congress to shape policies addressing the challenges of high school reform. Deshler is the recipient of numerous awards, including the J.E. Wallace Wallin Award for leadership in educational research, the Maxwell J. Schleifer Distinguished Service Award, and the Higuchi Research Achievement Award. Deshler’s most recent textbook (co-authored by Annemarie Palincsar, Gina Biancarosa, and Marnie Nair) is called Informed Choices: Principles and Programs for Adolescent Literacy. Deshler has authored numerous articles, books, and multimedia products. Deshler received his M.Ed. in learning disabilities and a doctorate in special education with a minor in psychology from the University of Arizona.


Barbara Ehren, Ed.D.

Barbara Ehren is a professor at the University of Central Florida (UCF) and serves as director of a doctoral program that focuses on language and literacy for struggling learners. Prior to joining UCF, she was a research scientist with the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning (KUCRL) where her emphasis was on strategic reading for adolescents, collaboration among professionals in schools, and school-wide literacy initiatives in secondary schools, including Response to Intervention (RTI). Her experience includes many years in public schools as a speech-language pathologist, teacher, and district administrator. She serves on numerous committees and editorial boards and chairs the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Committee on the Roles of Speech-Language Pathologists in Schools. She has a special interest in assisting school systems to build capacity at the school level for more effective literacy programs for diverse learners. A recurrent theme of her work is shared responsibility for literacy acquisition. She is a frequent consultant to states, school districts, and professional associations on RTI related issues. Ehren is a fellow of ASHA, a board recognized specialist in child language and a fellow of the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities She has served on several key ASHA committees, including the Ad Hoc Committee on Reading and Writing and is currently chair of the ASHA Working Group on the Roles of Speech-Language Pathologists in Schools. She serves on several other committees and editorial boards, including the advisory board of the RTI Action Network and the International Reading Association Commission on RTI. Ehren is the author of many publications focused on language and literacy.


Jack M. Fletcher, Ph.D.

Fletcher is a Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Houston. From 1978-1985, Fletcher was the acting director of the Mental Retardation/ Developmental Disabilities Research Section at the Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences; from 1989-2006, Fletcher was a tenured professor in the Division of Developmental Pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics at The University of Texas Medical School Houston. For the past 30 years, Fletcher, a board-certified child neuropsychologist, has worked on issues related to child neuropsychology, including studies of children with spina bifida, traumatic brain injury, and other acquired disorders. In the area of developmental learning and attention disorders, Fletcher has addressed issues related to definition and classification, neurobiological correlates, and most recently, intervention. Fletcher directs a Learning Disability Research Center grant and a long-term study involving genetic, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological factors in spina bifida, both funded by the National Institute of Child health and Human Development. He served on the NICHD National Advisory Council, the Rand Reading Study Group, the National Research Council Committee on Scientific Principles in Education Research, and the President’s Commission on Excellence in Special Education. The author of three books and over 200 papers, Fletcher was the recipient of the Samuel T. Orton award from the International Dyslexia Association in 2003 and a co-recipient of the Albert J. Harris award from the International Reading Association in 2006. He was president of the International Neuropsychological Society in 2008-2009. Fletcher received a B.A. from Davidson College and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Florida.


Jacqueline F. Kearns, Ed.D.

Jacqueline Kearns has extensive experience in training and technical assistance in inclusive education in addition to nine years of classroom experience teaching students with intellectual disabilities, significant cognitive disabilities, and students who have communication needs/AAC. She is a parent of a school-age child who was recently diagnosed with ADHD and a learning disability, and serves as a legal guardian for a friend who experiences autism. She serves as principal investigator for the federally funded National Alternate Assessment Center and Associate Director for ILSSA, a University of Kentucky based assessment design group. She co-authored Alternate Assessment – Measuring Outcomes and Supports (Baltimore: Paul Brookes) with Harold Kleinert.


Susan Rose, Ph.D.

Susan Rose possesses expertise in the areas of special education/ deaf and hard of hearing with an emphasis on literacy among deaf and hard of hearing students in grades K-12. She is a professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. Rose is also the coordinator of the special education program, the graduate program in education for deaf and hard of hearing children, and the faculty representative for ASL as a world language undergraduate program. She was a teacher serving children who were deaf or hard of hearing in classroom and itinerant settings for more than a decade prior to her career in teacher education and research. Rose has served on several national and state professional and community organizations with people who are deaf or hard of hearing; conducted research in the areas of communication, reading and writing, and computer-based technology. Her research has focused on information access for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, with an emphasis on language development, reading, and modality of coding language input. Rose has served as the project director for several training grants which have evolved into programs serving the special needs community of Minnesota and the deaf and hard of hearing education field nationally. A second area of training for Rose is the preparation of teachers of the deaf so that they can serve students with additional learning needs, including cultural adaptations and disabilities. Rose’s publications include journal articles, books, technical manuals, and software. She co-authored the Reading Bridge series and the revised Reading Milestones with Drs. Quigley and McAnally, and is the co-developer of the Reading Milestones Placement / Progress Monitoring (RMPM) assessment, AVE: ASL and AVE: DHH software and the Deaf- Hard of Hearing resources website including an inservice webinar for teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students. Rose received her doctorate from the Ohio State University.


Ann C. Schulte, Ph.D.

Ann Schulte is a professor of psychology and School Psychology Program Director at North Carolina State University. Following graduate school, she worked as a test developer and researcher with Psychometrics, Inc. before joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She spent 12 years at UNC, both as a School Psychology Program faculty member and later as a researcher and fellow at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center. Prior to coming to NC State in 1994, she was employed at Duke University Medical Center as a clinician in the Attention Disorders Program and a clinical supervisor on the Multi-modal Treatment of ADHD study. Schulte’s research interests center on improving the quality of services and educational outcomes for children with learning disorders. Within that area, her interests range from school responses to children with reading difficulties, to consultation, to the inclusion of children with disabilities in high stakes testing programs. She serves or has served on the editorial boards of School Psychology Review, Journal of School Psychology, Journal of Learning Disabilities, and Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, as well as served as associate editor of the School Psychology Quarterly. She has directed several federal grants and just completed a training grant focusing on preparing school psychologists to align their services with current reading research and school reform efforts. Schulte has authored numerous publications in the field of learning disabilities. Schulte earned her B.A. in experimental psychology from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and her Ph.D. in educational psychology with a specialization in school psychology from the University of Texas at Austin.


Richard Simpson, Ed.D.

Richard Simpson is a professor of special education at the University of Kansas. His research focuses on autism spectrum disorders and behavior disorders. As principal investigator for the training personnel to serve Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Simpson develops teacher educators, researchers, and supervisors with consultation, personnel training, and research experiences in urban and suburban public schools within linguistically and culturally diverse communities. He has also helped create the description and analysis of alternative educational programs for learners with emotional and behavioral challenges in the Kansas City area. In addition to authoring numerous books and journal articles, Simpson serves on the editorial board of Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities and is a reviewer for several other publications: Intervention in School and Clinic, Behavioral Disorders, and Special Education and Teacher Education. Simpson received his doctorate in special education from the University of Kansas.


Stephen W. Smith, Ph.D.

Stephen Smith is a professor in the Special Education program at the University of Florida (UF). Smith teaches graduate level courses in special education research, emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), and principles of prevention science in education. His research focuses on effective behavioral prevention strategies in educational settings, self-regulation of behavior (effortful control of thought, action, and emotion), issues related to aggression and violence in schools, and understanding verbal aggression of students with EBD. During his time at UF, Smith and colleagues have received over $8.5 million dollars to conduct research and development projects related to the prevention of and effective interventions for maladaptive student behavior in school settings. Smith has also obtained over $1.5 million dollars to train pre-service students to work in special education. He is currently serving as a principal investigator of a three-year, $1.5 million dollar research and development grant to create an extensive and theoretically based curriculum to improve self-regulatory functions of students with EBD. He is the author of 14 professional books and book chapters, and he has presented his findings and recommendations at numerous state, regional, national, and international professional conferences. He is a panel scientist for the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education and is on the editorial board of numerous professional journals in education and special education. He has authored numerous publications addressing special education. Smith was a teacher of special education students for eight years. Smith received a Ph.D. in special education from the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas and an M.S. from the Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri.


Martha L. Thurlow, Ph. D.

Martha Thurlow is the director for the National Center on Educational Outcomes and Senior Research Associate, Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota. She served on the CCSSO-NGA Common Core State Standards Initiative Validation Committee. Thurlow received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota.

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